FORBES: Motorola Razr 2019 Foldable Phone Will Kick Off New Price War

A replacement or repair will cost over $1000, which is more expensive than buying a brand new current generation phone.

Motorola Razr 2019 Foldable Phone
Motorola Razr 2019 Foldable Phone

Huawei’s yet-to-be released foldable Huawei Mate X may come with an expensive screen repair, according to Gizmochina.

By Jay McGregor Senior Contributor

A replacement or repair will cost over $1000, which is more expensive than buying a brand new current generation phone. Of course, as with any leak, this have to be taken with a pinch of salt. That’s also a price converted from Yuan – so it could be different in Western markets. 

With that said, the high fix or replacement price does speak to a wider problem of where buyers of foldable phones stand on warranty issues. The durability of foldable phones is, frankly, questionable.

The lab-testing tells a story of devices capable of withstanding thousands of folds before they collapse, but – as we’ve seen with Samsung’s Galaxy Fold display disaster – things can go wrong. 

In Samsung’s instance, it was people removing an important protective layer that led to the ultimate failure of the display. But there will be other, unforeseen, real-world problems that come with displays that are designed to crease – largely because they act as a natural weak point in the device.

The question, then, is how do manufacturers respond and make sure buyers aren’t left out of pocket – and why should they care? The simplest answer is that manufacturers will have to invest significantly in R&D to design new devices that house this new display technology – and they won’t want to lose droves of customers because of fixable warranty problems. Especially after that serious R&D investment. 

It’s in their interests to make sure consumers are looked after – particularly at this delicate stage when foldable tech balances on the knife edged of being perceived as a gimmicky, temporary fad technology or the future of smartphones. 

This is why Motorola’s free replacement and/or fix offer is intriguing. More

Jay McGregor

Jay McGregor Senior Contributor Consumer Tech FORBES