The Samsung foldable phone is here (Wait, why do I want one?)

A tantalizing glimpse was all Samsung gave. It was still enough to make one ponder.

When it's open, it's a tablet. Screenshot ZDNet
When it's open, it's a tablet. Screenshot ZDNet

He just pulled it out of his inside jacket pocket, as if this was just another little thing he carried around with him all the time.

And there it was.

What is the core excitement here? The sheer relief that it’s possible to have a phone that folds?

Well, what, exactly? A camouflaged phone created to show off Samsung’s Infinity Flex Display, the fancy wording for the company’s new foldable phone.

Samsung’s SVP of Mobile Product Marketing, Justin Denison, was effusive at yesterday’s Samsung Developer Conference.

He used creative phrases such as “taking it to the next level” and “big milestone.” He insisted he was “honored” to reveal this whole new generation of smartphones.

And then he held the phone up and unfolded it. At least one gasp was heard.

“When it’s open, it’s a tablet offering a big screen experience,” said Denison.

Well, a big square-screen experience from the prototype he was holding.

“When it’s closed, it’s a phone that fits neatly inside your pocket,” he added. So it seemed, as he slipped it away again and said “thank you,” as if he’d just pulled off a next-level magic trick.

I started wondering why I’d want one of these things. Meanwhile Denison explained that it would “help you browse, watch, connect and multitask like never before.”

It’s the “never before” part I’m currently struggling with. If this is, as Denison intimated, a sort of all-in-one phone and tablet, I’ll surely be browsing, watching, connecting and multitasking exactly as I did before.

And frankly, when I look at the iPhone XS Max, isn’t that an all-in-one phone and tablet? It’s certainly close.

Denison explained that Samsung had invented new materials and thrown out old assumptions.

Technically, there’s glory inside. Practically, however, why would you buy it? More

By  for Technically Incorrect zdnet.com